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Week 3: Diversity and Inclusion — Advanced Practice Master of Social Work students are required to understand how diversity and difference shapes the human experience and apply culturally respectful i

Week 3: Diversity and Inclusion — Advanced PracticeMaster of Social Work students are required to understand how diversity and difference shapes the human experience and apply culturally respectful interventions. Additionally, students are expected to develop awareness, knowledge, and skills to ensure culturally sensitive social work practice with diverse populations and constituencies. By participating in this online diversity and inclusion module, Advanced/Specialization students will build on current knowledge of diversity and difference, while applying social work advocacy skills to vulnerable populations.Learning ObjectiveStudents will:Analyze ally developmentPhoto Credit: Westend61/ Getty ImagesLearning ResourcesNote: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.Required ReadingsEdwards, K. E. (2006). Aspiring social justice ally identity development: A conceptual model. NASPA Journal (National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.), 43(4), 39–60. Retrieved from http://www-tandfonline-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/doi/abs/10.2202/1949-6605.1722Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.Required MediaBy now, you should have read the Announcement named “Sign Up for Your Clinical Skills Lab.” As noted there, watch each of the four introductory videos below that provide an overview of each session. Then, decide which session you’d like to attend, and go to the sign-up link provided in that announcement. Sessions may fill up quickly, so it is highly recommended that you don’t delay.Laureate Education (Producer). (2017a). An introduction to acceptance and commitment therapy, or ACT [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 9 minutes.Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload TranscriptLaureate Education (Producer). (2017b). An introduction to cognitive behavioral therapy in social work practice [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 7 minutes.Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload TranscriptLaureate Education (Producer). (2017c). An introduction to restorative justice [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 7 minutes.Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload TranscriptLaureate Education (Producer). (2017d). An introduction to Seeking Safety [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author. Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.Accessible player –Downloads–Download Video w/CCDownload AudioDownload TranscriptOptional ResourcesFisher-Borne, M., Montana Cain, J., & Martin, S. L. (2015). From mastery to accountability: Cultural humility as an alternative to cultural competence. Social Work Education, 34(2), 165–181. doi:10.1080/02615479.2014.977244Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.Hancock, T. U., Waites, C., & Kledaras, C. G. (2012). Facing structural inequality: Students’ orientation to oppression and practice with oppressed groups. Journal of Social Work Education, 481(1), 5–25. doi:10.5175/JSWE.2012.201000078Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.National Association of Social Workers. (2008). Code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers. Retrieved from http://www.socialworkers.org/pubs/Code/code.aspDiscussion: Ally DevelopmentIf you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But, if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.— Lila Watson, Aboriginal activistThe above quote captures one aspect of ally development. The Edwards article provides important information about becoming an ally and developing advocacy skills, focusing on effective identity development, consistency, and sustainability. As a starting point, consider these questions regarding the article:How does the Watson quote mirror those ideas? How can you identify, remain consistent, and practice sustainability in your ally development?In this Discussion, review the article and explore the topic of social justice ally development.By Day 3Post:Identify a population with which you could become an ally. Identify a quote or create a motto to capture the intent of your ally-ship. Identify potential obstacles to ally-ship and explain how to address them. Include any references in your post.By Day 5Respond to at least one of your colleague’s postings in one or more of the following ways:Ask a probing question. Share an insight from having read yourcolleague’s posting. Offer and support an opinion. Validate an idea with your own experience. Make a suggestion. Expand on your colleague’s posting.